This information is for City of Wolverhampton Council employees only.

Useful Links

Frequently Asked Questions

General Questions about COVID-19
Where can I find up-to-date, general advice/information about Coronavirus (COVID-19)?
What are the signs and symptoms of COVID-19?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are:

  • a new, continuous cough this means coughing a lot more for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a high temperature, this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)

Generally, these infections can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease.

What is the best way to prevent me from getting COVID-19?

Stay at home to stop coronavirus spreading

Everyone must stay at home to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

You should only leave the house for 1 of 4 reasons:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example, food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example, a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home

These 4 reasons are exceptions – even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

This is particularly important for people who:

  • are 70 or over
  • have a long-term condition
  • are pregnant
  • have a weakened immune system

It is also essential to practice good hygiene measures;

Do:

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • avoid close contact with people who have symptoms of coronavirus
  • use phone, online services, or apps to contact your GP surgery or other NHS services

Don’t:

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean
I have symptoms, what do I need to do?

Please check the guidance for employees. This can be found in the downloads section

If I have symptoms or live with someone who does, do I need to access NHS 111?

You do not need to go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

This can be accessed here - https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19/

Only call 111 if you cannot get help online.

I have symptoms and need to self-isolate, what does that mean?

If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or a new, continuous cough), use the 111 coronavirus service to find out what to do.

Please see the following link for self-isolation advice https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/self-isolation-advice/

Do not leave your home if you have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) or live with someone who does.

This is called self-isolation.

If you are self-isolating, you must:

  • not leave your home for any reason, other than to exercise once a day – but stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from other people
  • not go out to buy food or collect medicine – order them by phone or online, or ask someone else to drop them off at your home
  • not have visitors, such as friends and family, in your home

You can use your garden if you have one.

If you have symptoms of coronavirus, you'll need to self-isolate for 7 days.

See the Self Isolation Guidance document in the Downloads section

Symptoms and Self-isolating
I have symptoms and therefore need to self-isolate, who do I need to inform?

Please see the Guidance for Employees. This can be found in the Downloads section.

Employees that have symptoms and need to self-isolate should contact their line manager. Your line manager will help to determine if you are able to work from home. This will depend on your job and the severity of your symptoms.

Your line manager will notify the HR Support Desk.

If you are too unwell to phone your line manager, please ask someone if they can do this on your behalf.

Where possible, maintain contact with your line manager by phone every 4 days or as agreed with your line manager.

When employees return to work employees or their line manager should contact the HR Support Desk to record the end of the self-isolation period.

I have symptoms of COVID-19, I have mild symptoms but feel well enough to work. What options are available to me to enable this?

Phone your line manager to discuss the prospect of working from home.

You should be able to return to normal working practices after 7 days - if you feel well and have no temperature you can return to a normal routine. Please keep your line manager informed.

If you are already working from home please inform your manager that you have symptoms so your self- isolation can be recorded.

At the end of your isolation period, you or your line manager must inform HR Support Desk so the end of the isolation period can be recorded.

I live with someone who has symptoms, what do I need to do?

Please see the Guidance for Employees. This can be found in the Downloads section.

I live with someone who has symptoms, who do I need to inform?

Employees that live with someone that has symptoms and need to self-isolate should contact their line manager. Your line manager will help to determine if you are able to work from home. This will depend on your job

Your line manager will notify the HR Support Desk.

Where possible, maintain contact with your line manager by phone at least every 4 days or as agreed with your line manager.

When employees return to work they should contact the HR Support Desk to record the end of the self-isolation period.

If you are already working from home please inform your manager that a member of your household has symptoms so your self- isolation can be recorded. The HR Support Desk must be informed at the end of your self-isolation period.

I am self-isolating because someone in my household has symptoms but I have developed symptoms myself. Do I need to notify my manager?

Please see the Guidance for Employees. This can be found in the Downloads section.

Yes, you do need to notify your line manager on the first working day following your symptoms starting. You will need to advise them of the day your symptoms started. You will need to stay at home for 7 days. After this, if you feel well and have no temperature you can return to a normal routine.

The cough may persist for several weeks in some people, despite the coronavirus infection having cleared. A persistent cough alone does not mean you must continue to self-isolate for more than 7 days - if you feel well enough and do not have a temperature you can return to a normal routine

The HR Support Desk should be informed of the change in circumstances and notified of the end of the self-isolation period.

I have been in contact with someone, outside of my household, who has symptoms of COVID-19, what should I do?

Due to social distancing restrictions, you should not be having any contact with those outside of your household, unless this is to provide essential care to someone e.g. washing, dressing and meal preparation.

If someone outside of your household develops symptoms, and you have been in contact with them within a specified time period, you may be advised by a health professional. You will be asked to remain vigilant and if you develop symptoms to self-isolate as soon as possible. If you do not yourself have symptoms, you are not required to self-isolate.

When can I return to work?

Please see the Self Isolation Guidance document. This can be found in the Downloads section.

If you have symptoms you must stay at home for 7 days. After this, if you feel well and have no temperature you can return to a normal routine.

If you are in the wider household you are required to stay at home for 14 days (from the day the first person in the household developed symptoms) before you return to your normal routine.

However;

  • If during this time you develop symptoms, you are then required to stay at home for 7 days (regardless of the day you are on within the 14 day isolation period)
    • As an example, if you are on day 11, and you develop symptoms, you then have an additional 7 days at home so you can return to a normal routine after 18 days (if you feel well and do not have a temperature)
    • As an example, if you are on day 3, and you develop symptoms, you have an additional 7 days at home so can return to a normal routine after 10 days (if you feel well and do not have a temperature)
  • If another person in that household develops symptoms during the 14 days, there is no need for the isolation period to be extended for the whole household - the person with new symptoms is required to stay at home for 7 days

The cough may persist for several weeks in some people, despite the coronavirus infection having cleared. A persistent cough alone does not mean you must continue to self-isolate for more than 7 days - if you feel well enough and do not have a temperature you can return to a normal routine.

Will I be tested for COVID-19?

Those staying at home with mild symptoms will not be tested.

I must self-isolate and I cannot work from home due to the nature of my job. Will this impact on my pay or count towards sickness triggers?

If you need to self-isolate, however, you cannot work from home due to the nature of your role, you will still be paid in the normal way. Your absence will be recorded as ‘self-isolation’ and will not count towards Management of Attendance trigger points.

Managers should explore possible alternative duties that can be conducted from home, if this is not possible employees may be redeployed to alternative and appropriate duties to help ensure that the council is maintaining business continuity during this emergency situation. If we are unable to redeploy employees to alternative duties, pay will not be affected.

I am on a zero hours contract, if I have to self-isolate will I get paid?

Where employees cannot attend work through no fault of their own, there will be a calculation of average weekly earnings and this will be paid.

Is medical evidence needed if I am required to self-isolate?

No medical evidence is required as you can self-certify for the duration of the self-isolation period. However, maintain contact with your line manager as a minimum every 4 days. If you are provided with a Fit Note for your self-isolation period there is no requirement to provide HR or Payroll a copy.

Pregnancy and COVID-19
I am pregnant and I am concerned about contracting COVID-19 and the potential effect on the pregnancy/baby?

Pregnant woman have been identified by the Chief Medical Officer as a vulnerable group. This is a caution, as we know that some viral infections can be worse in pregnant women. At the moment, there’s no evidence that this is the case for coronavirus infection, but the amount of evidence available is still quite limited.

Based on the evidence we have so far:

  • Pregnant women are no more likely to contract coronavirus than the general population
  • Pregnant women who get this infection, are no more at risk of serious complications than any other healthy individuals.
  • It is expected that the large majority of pregnant women will experience only mild or moderate cold/flu like symptoms should they develop coronavirus.
  • There is no increased risk of miscarriage in women who develop coronavirus.
  • There is no suggestion that the virus can pass to your baby while you are pregnant or during birth.

However, as a precaution, and to protect both yourself and others, you should follow government advice about reducing social contact through ‘social distancing’; stay away from public places and avoid anyone who has symptoms suggestive of coronavirus. Particularly if you are in your third trimester (more than 28 weeks pregnant).

The government has advised everyone to reduce social contact through ‘social distancing/staying at home’. But this is especially important for people like you, who are in a vulnerable group.

Social distancing measures are steps you can take to reduce the social interaction between people. This will help reduce the transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19).

They are:

  • Avoid contact with someone who is displaying symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19). These symptoms include high temperature and/or new and continuous cough
  • You should only leave the house for 1 of 4 reasons:
  1. shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  2. one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  3. any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  4. travelling to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home
  • Use telephone or online services to contact your GP or other essential services

Further information can be found at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists here www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/guidelines/coronavirus-pregnancy/covid-19-virus-infection-and-pregnancy/

I am pregnant and work in a public facing role, am I still able to work?

We understand that it must be an anxious time if you are pregnant and you work in a public facing role.

Pregnant women who can work from home should do so.

For those whose roles can’t work from home, managers should explore possible alternative duties that can be conducted from home.

Detailed occupational health advice for pregnant women, including those who cannot work from home was published on 21 March 2020, and updated on 26 March. It recommends that if you are in your first or second trimester (less than 28 weeks pregnant), with no underlying health conditions, you should practice social distancing/’stay at home’ measures but can choose to continue to work in a public-facing role, provided the necessary precautions are taken - these include the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) where required and risk assessments.

If you are in your third trimester (more than 28 weeks pregnant),or have an underlying health condition – such as heart or lung disease - you should work from home, avoid contact with anyone with symptoms of coronavirus, and significantly reduce unnecessary social contact.

Managers should explore possible alternative duties that can be conducted from home, if this is not possible employees may be redeployed to alternative and appropriate duties to help ensure that the council is maintaining business continuity during this emergency situation. If we are unable to redeploy employees to alternative duties, pay will not be affected.

More detailed advice for pregnant women, from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and can be found here www.rcog.org.uk/en/guidelines-research-services/guidelines/coronavirus-pregnancy/covid-19-virus-infection-and-pregnancy/

I am pregnant and am a healthcare worker, am I able to work?

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists guidance was updated on 26 March to emphasise that pregnant women of any gestation should be offered the choice of whether to work in direct patient-facing roles during the coronavirus pandemic. Your choices on whether you continue to work in direct patient-facing roles during the coronavirus pandemic will be respected and supported by your employers.

Advice for pregnant healthcare workers before 28 weeks gestation

If you are in your first or second trimester (less than 28 weeks pregnant), with no underlying health conditions, you should practise social distancing but can choose to continue to work in a patient-facing role. If you choose to continue working, it is strongly recommended the necessary precautions are taken. You should avoid, where possible, caring for patients with suspected or confirmed coronavirus infection. If this is not possible, you should use personal protective equipment (PPE) and ensure a thorough risk assessment is undertaken.

Advice for pregnant healthcare workers after 28 weeks gestation, or with an underlying health condition

If you are in your third trimester (more than 28 weeks pregnant),or have an underlying health condition – such as heart or lung disease – we strongly recommend you avoid direct patient contact. You should work from home, avoid contact with anyone with symptoms of coronavirus, and significantly reduce unnecessary social contact.

Managers should explore possible alternative duties that can be conducted from home, if this is not possible employees may be redeployed to alternative and appropriate duties to help ensure that the council is maintaining business continuity during this emergency situation. If we are unable to redeploy employees to alternative duties, pay will not be affected.

I have an employee who is pregnant but has been unable to obtain a MATB1 form. What advice should I provide?

Submission of the MATB1 form can be delayed, however employees should still provide the notice required to take maternity leave as stipulated in the support for carers policy.

Managers should continue to undertake risk assessments etc in the normal way.

Vulnerable employees & relatives
I am an ‘extremely vulnerable’ person and have received a letter from the NHS, what should I do about work?

Coronavirus can make anyone seriously ill, but there are some people who are extremely vulnerable. For example, you may be extremely vulnerable to coronavirus if you:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having certain types of cancer treatment
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer, such as leukaemia
  • have a severe lung condition, such as cystic fibrosis or severe asthma
  • have a condition that makes you much more likely to get infections
  • are taking medicine that weakens your immune system
  • are pregnant and have a serious heart condition

If you have one of these conditions you should are strongly advised to shield.

‘Shielding’ is a measure to protect extremely vulnerable people by minimising interaction between those who are extremely vulnerable and others. This means that those who are extremely vulnerable should not leave their homes, and within their homes should minimise all non-essential contact with other members of their household, staying at least 2 meters apart where possible:

  1. Strictly avoid contact with someone who is displaying symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19). These symptoms include high temperature and/or new and continuous cough.
  2. Do not leave your house.
  3. Do not attend any gatherings. This includes gatherings of friends and families in private spaces, for example, family homes, weddings and religious services.
  4. Do not go out for shopping, leisure or travel and, when arranging food or medication deliveries, these should be left at the door to minimise contact.
  5. Keep in touch using remote technology such as phone, internet, and social media

You do not need to come to work. Managers should explore possible alternative duties that can be conducted from home, if this is not possible employees may be redeployed to alternative and appropriate duties to help ensure that the council is maintaining business continuity during this emergency situation. If we are unable to redeployee employees to alternative duties, pay will not be affected.

I am a ‘vulnerable’ employee who is over 70 years old, has a weakened immune system or has a long term condition.

We are advising those who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. This group includes those who are:

  1. aged 70 or older (regardless of medical conditions)
  2. under 70 with an underlying health condition listed below (ie anyone instructed to get a flu jab as an adult each year on medical grounds):
  • chronic (long-term) respiratory diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema or bronchitis
  • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
  • chronic kidney disease
  • chronic liver disease, such as hepatitis
  • chronic neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a learning disability or cerebral palsy
  • diabetes
  • problems with your spleen – for example, sickle cell disease or if you have had your spleen removed
  • weakened immune system as the result of conditions such as HIV and AIDS, or medicines such as steroid tablets or chemotherapy
  • being seriously overweight (a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)

If you have a health condition in the list above discuss your concerns with your Line Manager Your Line Manager will do an assessment of your health condition and the requirements of your job role, in partnership with occupational health, and make adjustments if this is deemed necessary.

We are advising those who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) to be particularly stringent in following social distancing/’stay at home’ measures.

Social distancing/’stay at home’ measures are steps you can take to reduce the social interaction between people. This will help reduce the transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19).

They are:

  • Avoid contact with someone who is displaying symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19). These symptoms include high temperature and/or new and continuous cough
  • You should only leave the house for 1 of 4 reasons:
  1. shopping for basic necessities, for example, food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  2. one form of exercise a day, for example, a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  3. any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  4. travelling to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home
  • Use telephone or online services to contact your GP or other essential services

Guidance for those over 70 and other vulnerable groups is that you should not allow visitors during this time unless they are providing essential care for you. Essential care includes things like help with washing, dressing, or preparing meals.

Please see the supporting vulnerable employees document in the Downloads section

I do not have any symptoms of COVID-19 but I am however concerned about contracting it and passing it onto ‘extremely vulnerable’ dependants that I live with and/or care for?

If you live with or care for someone who has a health condition that places them in the ‘extremely vulnerable’ group and they will have received a letter strongly advising them to shield.

‘Shielding’ is a measure to protect extremely vulnerable people by minimising interaction between those who are extremely vulnerable and others. This means that those who are extremely vulnerable should not leave their homes, and within their homes should minimise all non-essential contact with other members of their household, staying at least 2 meters apart where possible:

  1. Strictly avoid contact with someone who is displaying symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19). These symptoms include high temperature and/or new and continuous cough.
  2. Do not leave your house.
  3. Do not attend any gatherings. This includes gatherings of friends and families in private spaces, for example, family homes, weddings and religious services.
  4. Do not go out for shopping, leisure or travel and, when arranging food or medication deliveries, these should be left at the door to minimise contact.
  5. Keep in touch using remote technology such as phone, internet, and social media

We understand this can be cause for concern, please discuss your concerns with your Line Manager. Your Line Manager will do an assessment of their health condition and the requirements of your job role, in partnership with occupational health, and make adjustments if this is deemed necessary.

Guidance for this group is that you should not visit them during this time unless you are providing essential care for them. Essential care includes things like help with washing, dressing, or preparing meals.

If they also receive regular health or social care from an organisation, either through the local authority or paid for by yourself, inform the care providers that you are reducing social contacts and agree on a plan for continuing their care.

If you are caring for someone who is vulnerable, there are some simple steps that you can take to protect yourself and them and to reduce their risk at the current time.

  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin straight away and wash your hands afterwards
  • try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
  • do not visit if you are unwell and make alternative arrangements for their care
  • provide information on who they should call if they feel unwell, how to use NHS 111 online coronavirus service and leave the number for NHS 111 prominently displayed
  • find out about different sources of support that could be used and access further advice on creating a contingency plan is available from Carers UK

You may find this guidance on Home care provision useful.

All employees can access free, confidential counselling through the employee assistance programme. Further details can be found here.

I do not have any symptoms of COVID-19 but I am however concerned about contracting it and passing it onto ‘vulnerable’ dependants that I live with and/or care for?

We understand this can be cause for concern. However, the current advice is that you continue to work as normal. If you feel you are unable to attend work, you may want to consider taking annual or unpaid leave with agreement from your line manager.

Everyone should now be taking social distancing/’stay at home’ measures to reduce social interaction between people in order to reduce the transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19).

Social distancing/’stay at home’ measures are steps you can take to reduce the social interaction between people. This will help reduce the transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19).

They are:

  • Avoid contact with someone who is displaying symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19). These symptoms include high temperature and/or new and continuous cough
  • You should only leave the house for 1 of 4 reasons:
  1. shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  2. one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  3. any medical need, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  4. travelling to and from work, but only where this absolutely cannot be done from home
  • Use telephone or online services to contact your GP or other essential services

We strongly advise you to follow the above measures.

If the person you care for needs help getting deliveries of essential supplies like food, you can register to get coronavirus support.

I manage an employee who has informed me that they are ‘vulnerable’, what do I need to do?

See ‘support for vulnerable employees’ flowchart’ for information on how to support your employee at this time.

Annual Leave
I have booked a holiday abroad in the coming months – is there anything I should consider?

For information on travelling abroad, we recommend following the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) country advice pages.

Can I cancel my annual leave?

Employees should discuss with Line Managers if requests to cancel leave can be agreed. If the work you are undertaking is not critical to the Covid-19 response your manager may not agree to your request to cancel some or all of your booked annual leave.

I have a small team - some members of staff are staying at home/on sick leave etc. I have others who have booked annual leave, can I ask them to cancel their annual leave to maintain service delivery?

You can ask employees to cancel or postpone annual leave if it is necessary to maintain service delivery. However, you must give the appropriate notice, for example, one week’s notice for one week’s leave (annual leave only).  Employees who have been unable to take all their leave by the end of their leave year will be able to carry leave forward. In limited circumstances, manager may be able to agree that employees can be paid for untaken leave. Managers considering paying employees for untaken leave must discuss with their HR Business Partner.

I am following advice to self-isolate. I had booked annual leave which overlaps with this period, can I claim the overlapping days back?

If your self-isolation period falls across a period of booked annual leave employees will be able to claim the annual leave back.

Can my manager require me to take annual leave?

Employees who are not key workers will be required to take a minimum of one weeks leave in the next 12 weeks, if they have not already done so since W/C 23 March 2020

I have a term time only contract but I am working in the school holidays, what will I be paid.

Term time only employees that are providing services to schools or have been redeployed to alternative roles may be required to work during the school holidays.  In these circumstances, employees should claim additional hours for the hours worked or claim time off in lieu (TOIL). TOIL and additional hours will be claimed at plain time.

I do not normally work bank holidays, what will I be paid?

Some employees will be working the forthcoming bank holidays who are not normally expected to work during a public holiday and the arrangements for payment are:

  • Grade 5 and below: Overtime hourly rate of 1.25 (employees already paid for the day so this would be an additional 0.25 per hour) plus time off in lieu
  • Grade 6 and above: Time off in lieu (as employee has already been paid for the day)

In both circumstances’ employees can choose to be paid TOIL at plain time.

Further guidance will be available on the HR Intranet for employees to claim bank holiday payments.

I am on special leave. Can I cancel my booked annual leave?

Employees on special leave are either;

  • Employees in the vulnerable group that undertake roles that cannot be undertaken at home, or
  • Employees with child care/dependants that undertake roles do not fall into the Keyworker groups that cannot be undertaken at home

In these circumstances, employees will be unable to cancel booked annual leave

School closures and childcare arrangements
My child’s school/childcare setting has closed due to COVID-19 and I have no alternative childcare arrangements – what should I do?

From Friday 20th March if employees are unable to attend work because they have child care responsibilities where possible managers should discuss with the employee home working arrangements and flexibility when this is undertaken. 

For employees that undertake roles that do not readily lend themselves to homeworking, a period of special leave can be taken. Special leave will not impact employees pay.  Where employees are being granted special leave they may be asked to undertake alternative and appropriate duties that can be undertaken at home to help ensure that the council is maintaining business continuity during this emergency situation.

Some employees will be required to continue to undertake their role as they are deemed to be “key workers”. Schools are remaining open for the children of key workers.  Key workers should only send their children to school if they can not safely be cared for at home.

Employees are strongly advised not to leave children in the care of anyone in the vulnerable groups wherever this is possible.

How do I record the special leave granted to an employee for childcare?

Managers will need to email HR.SupportDesk@wolverhampton.gov.uk so the period of special leave can be recorded in Agresso.

A member of staff has asked for a keyworker letter to issue to their child’s school, how do I obtain one of these?

Employees may be required to provide schools with a letter confirming their key worker status. Managers (not individual employees) should then email execsupportcentralresources@wolverhampton.gov.uk to issue a letter.

Manager will need to provide the following information:

  1. Email address of key worker
  2. Full name of key worker
  3. Name of approver/manager (who wants the employee to have a letter)

Children of key workers should only be sent to school if they cannot safely be cared for at home. Employees are strongly advised not to leave children in the care of anyone in the vulnerable groups wherever the is possible.

Agile working/working from home
How long will it be necessary to ask staff where possible to work from home?

We are proposing that working from home is the councils default position where possible until after the Easter holidays which run until Friday 17th April.

Where possible employees will be requested to work from home. All home working arrangements must be agreed with line managers to ensure that we can maintain essential frontline services.

I am already working from home when I and / or a member of my household develops symptoms, do I still need to advise my manager?

Yes. Employees should contact their line manager to advise that they are self isolating. Managers should complete the reporting form which can be found on the HR Intranet here and send it to hr.supportdesk@wolverhampton.gov.uk  

Will I receive a payment towards my utility bills if I work from home?

No – we feel this is a mutual benefit. You will be saving on travel expenditure and travel time to and from work.

My equipment has been adjusted at work to enable me to undertake my role effectively. I am concerned that if it is made compulsory to work from home I will not be able to fulfil the full range of my duties without those adjustments. What options are avail

Discuss your concerns with your line manager.

If it is not feasible to provide continuity of adjustments at home, a risk assessment may need to be completed asap to enable you to conduct as much of your role as possible without the adjustments. Adjustments may need to be made to working hours, number of hours etc without detriment to pay.

Will I still need to pay for a car park if I am agile working?

Yes you will still be required to pay for your car park for the duration of time that you are working from home.

Employees can decide to cancel their carpark permit by contacting car.parks@wolverhampton.gov.uk

Please note that should you re-apply for a future car park space there may be limited availability.

Alternative Duties / Redeployees
Am I insured to use my own vehicle on Covid-19 related work activities either by my own insurer or the Council’s?

The Council has arranged a temporary extension to cover employees vehicles and liabilities on specific authorised Covid-19 related work journeys.  The journey to work will continue to be covered by their own motor insurance as standard.

Am I insured by the Council’s motor insurance policy to use my own vehicle on normal Council business?

No – you must have cover for business use as per the Corporate Driving at Work Policy.

Are volunteers covered by the Council’s motor insurance temporary extension?

No – but the Association of British Insurers confirmed with effect from 27 March 2020 that policyholders will be covered by their own motor insurance for volunteering journeys associated with Covid-19 without needing to notify their insurers

Is my home insurance affected by me working from home?

Usually insurers provide cover as standard for working from home which is clerical based.  The Association of British Insurers have confirmed it is not necessary for policyholders to contact their insurers if they are working at home in a clerical role as a result of Covid-19. 

Where can I find further information about the impact of Covid-19 on insurance products?

The information hub on the Association of British Insurers website at this link https://www.abi.org.uk/products-and-issues/topics-and-issues/coronavirus-hub/

Can anyone apply to be redeployed to another role?

If you are interested in helping out you will need to speak to your manager first to find out if they will be supportive as they also have to ensure business continuity in the service. If your request is supported you will need to complete a form which you can access from the following link:  https://resourcedeployment.wolverhampton.gov.uk/Home/ShortForm

How will I be selected for a redeployment role?

The redeployment team are matching employee skills and experience to the demands they receive an on employees consent they will pass details on to the relevant service manager to discuss the finer details of the role e.g. start date, timing and training. Employees will be redeployed to a similar grade or level of responsibility and only required to work their usual working hours as there is no expectation to work anything over this unless a redeployee is willing to do so.

How will I be paid if I am working more than my contacted hours of work whilst I am being redeployed?

You will need to submit an additional hour claim form through Agresso identifying that you have undertaken additional hours of work to support the council in delivering services due to Covid-19.

Do I have to agree to be redeployed to another role?

No – but it is hoped that employees will volunteer to support the critical services that the council is delivering.  However, you could be asked to carry out your role in another area e.g. if you are a driver within transport you could be redeployed to drive in waste services to transport employees. 

15165